Inpatient Versus Outpatient Treatment For Anorexia Nervosa

Posted by on Jul 28, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Anorexia is one of the more serious types of eating disorders, as it has the highest fatality rate among mental illnesses. Because of this, it’s important to make sure that people suffering from this illness get the proper treatment. Unfortunately, only about one-third of those who have anorexia actually get any type of treatment. Among the options are inpatient and outpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Taking a few things into consideration can make it clearer which type of treatment may be best. Overall Satisfaction One study found that people were more satisfied with outpatient eating disorder treatment than with inpatient treatment and that it tended to have better results and adherence to the treatment program. Patients like the fact that with outpatient eating disorder treatment centers their lives aren’t so disrupted and they can still continue going to school or work, so it isn’t as obvious to other people that they’re attending treatment. It can be hard to get a month off of work for an inpatient program, for example. Severity of Condition In some cases, there really isn’t much of a choice in the type of anorexia treatment. People with very severe anorexia who have physical complications from anorexia, suicidal tendencies, or certain lab findings often require the monitoring and treatment that is only available as part of an inpatient treatment program. Likewise, if a person isn’t responding well to an adolescent outpatient eating disorder treatment program, it may be necessary to try a more intensive inpatient treatment program. Outpatient treatment is better suited to those who have a less severe form of anorexia, not for those who have life-threatening behaviors or those who need to have all of their meals supervised. Another option is intensive outpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. This involves having three 3-hour sessions each week with various forms of therapy and some potential meal supervision. Each program typically lasts between three and four months. Things to Consider Before choosing a treatment program, consider whether it will be covered by insurance, the types of treatment and therapy offered, whether any other conditions the patient has can also be treated, whether the program is accredited and the overall quality of the program. It’s also a good idea to take into account the personality of the patient and whether the program would be a good fit. It won’t help be as easy for the person to complete the treatment successfully if they’re miserable the whole...

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3 Tips For Storing Catheters

Posted by on Jul 1, 2016 in Uncategorized |

If you or someone you care for has to use a catheter, you might be concerned about the proper storage of these urological supplies. Luckily, following a few rules of thumb can help you store them properly. 1. Keep in Their Original Packaging Until Needed First of all, you should know that it is typically best to store your catheters in their original packaging. They are typically packaged in sterile packaging, so minimizing contact can help keep them clean and safe to use. Plus, the packaging that they come in is typically designed to maximize shelf life. Before using, make sure that you check the packaging on each catheter to ensure that the package has not been tampered with. 2. Keep Out of the Sunlight and Heat​ When storing catheters, make sure that you keep them out of the sunlight and heat. Instead, keep them in a cool, dry place, such as in a cabinet or drawer. The exposure to the sunlight could affect the packaging or the catheters themselves. When carrying catheters while you are out and about, avoid placing them in direct sunlight in the car; instead, consider keeping them in a small bag in the center console of the vehicle. You can even keep a bag of catheters underneath your wheelchair seat, if you use one, to keep them out of the sun yet close at hand. 3. Rotate by Expiration Date One thing that a lot of people do not know is that catheters and other urological supplies actually have expiration dates. It is recommended to use these products by these dates, but it can be easy to lose track of shelf life if you aren’t careful. Each time that you purchase a new package of catheters, make sure that you check the shelf life date and compare to the dates on the packages that you already have. Then, put the catheters with the soonest expiration date at the front or top of the rest so that they will be used first. As you can see, there are a few general guidelines that you will want to keep in mind if you have to keep catheters on hand, whether for yourself or someone who you take care of. If you follow these three tips and make sure that you purchase all of your urological supplies from a company that you trust, you should not have anything to worry about when storing them. Click here for more...

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Three Common Asthma Myths Debunked

Posted by on Jul 1, 2016 in Uncategorized |

It’s estimated that approximately 24 million Americans suffer from asthma. Attacks occur when allergens or irritants enter your lungs, causing your airways to narrow so that it’s difficult to breathe. If an asthma attack is bad enough it can be deadly. In fact, approximately 10 Americans die from asthma attacks each day. Unfortunately, there isn’t a cure for asthma. It can be managed with the help of an asthma specialist, but before you can create an action plan, you need learn the truth behind these common myths surrounding the disease. Medicine is Only Needed During an Attack Asthma attacks are often controlled by using an inhaler. Because of this, many people believe that you only need medicine when you have an asthma attack. However, that isn’t true. The frequency with which you need medication depends on the severity of your disease. Asthma is classified into four different levels: intermittent, mild persistent, moderate persistent, and severe persistent. If you only have intermittent asthma, there’s a good chance that your asthma specialist won’t recommend daily medication. However, if you have a more severe case, your action plan could include some type of daily long-term medication to control your symptoms, such as an inhaled corticosteroid. Remember, everyone with asthma should have an inhaler in case of an emergency, so if you don’t have one, you should discuss your options with your doctor. Moving to a Dry Climate Can Cure Your Asthma While moving to an area with a drier climate may temporarily improve your asthma symptoms, it won’t cure your disease. Instead of packing up your household, try keeping your windows closed during pollen season and using a dehumidifier when the weather is damp. Also, you should change the filters in your air conditioner and furnace on a regular basis to maintain a good air quality level in your home. You can also have your air conditioner unit and furnace cleaned each year to minimize the amount of dust in your home. Using Your Asthma Inhaler on a Daily Basis is Normal Asthma relief inhalers are designed to be used in emergency situations, not on a daily basis. If you’re using your inhaler every day, your asthma isn’t under control. You should talk to your asthma specialist as soon as possible to see if taking a daily medication would help relieve your symptoms. While your doctor won’t be able to cure your asthma completely, he or she can help you get your symptoms under control so that you can live a normal, rewarding life. If you are having trouble controlling your symptoms, you should consider talking to an asthma specialist like those found at The Regional Allergy Asthma & Immunology Center, PC to...

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